Greenhouse Effect

From FIDICTerms
Jump to: navigation, search
Term Info
Greenhouse Effect
Category Sustainable Development Terms
Last Edit By FIDIC
E-Mail suggestions [at] fidicterms.org
Last Edit Date 2018-06-29

Greenhouse Effect means :

SDABC2015.png The ABC for Sustainable Cities - A glossary for policy makers. 1st edition (2015)

The Sun powers Earth’s climate, radiating energy at very short wavelengths, predominately in the visible or near-visible (e.g., ultraviolet) part of the spectrum. Roughly one-third of the solar energy that reaches the top of Earth’s atmosphere is reflected directly back to space. The remaining two-thirds is absorbed by the surface and, to a lesser extent, by the atmosphere. To balance the absorbed incoming energy, the Earth must, on average, radiate the same amount of energy back to space. Because the Earth is much colder than the Sun, it radiates at much longer wavelengths, primarily in the infrared part of the spectrum. Much of this thermal radiation emitted by the land and ocean is absorbed by the atmosphere, including clouds, and reradiated back to Earth. This is called the greenhouse effect. The glass walls in a greenhouse reduce airflow and increase the temperature of the air inside. Analogously, but through a different physical process, the Earth’s greenhouse effect warms the surface of the planet. Without the natural greenhouse effect, the average temperature at Earth’s surface would be below the freezing point of water. Thus, Earth’s natural greenhouse effect makes life as we know it possible. However, human activities, primarily the burning of fossil fuels and clearing of forests, have greatly intensified the natural greenhouse effect, causing global warming.

IPCC, FAQ 1.3 What is the Greenhouse Effect?, https://www.ipcc.ch/publications_and_data/ar4/wg1/en/faq-1-3.html